CROSS-talk with Niero

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This week we've caught up with a veteran modder, modeller, and texture artist who has created a dazzling array of high quality and highly customisable content for Fallout 4. Niero has recently also tried his hand at Skyrim mods, creating one of the top weapon mods this year CROSS_Crucible.

Thank you for taking the time out to chat with us. Before we talk modding, can you tell us a little about yourself?

Hey there, thanks for the interview, I'm a west coast American who takes hobbies very seriously.


How did you first get into video games? 

I was a Starwars book nerd, and that sort of led into it. The first game I have a ton of memories from is Jedi Knight II.


How would you describe the mods you create?

In a word: customization. I like the idea that everyone gets something a little different out of my content. The ability to customize a player character in video games is super important to me when I play games, so its only natural that I forward that to my content. I really get a kick out of seeing screenshots of characters using my content in ways I never thought of.



When you’re not modding, what other hobbies do you enjoy?

I've been into sculpture since as long as I can remember, clay/wire that sort of thing. I only really got seriously into the digital side of sculpting because of Fallout 4. Learning and figuring out new things is my real hobby. Picture that kid that breaks all their own toys, that's me, because I'm more interested in how they work than what they do.


When you think about making a mod, what do you take inspiration from? 

Most of my mods are branched off of previous mods in some abstract internal way. When I make a mod I tend to experiment a lot and those experiments open doors to make stuff I previously thought impossible. A good example: I started the whole Blades/Crucible project as a way to mess around more with what I learned from the Cryolance. As far as inspiration for the raw content goes, it's tough to say. Fallout's weird post-apoc brutal-deco-scifi aesthetic is easy to expand on so there's tons of ideas that can work. Sometimes I like to do stuff just for the challenge, and then make it fit in with lore-gymnastics (like the Recall Collar).


All your mods have "CROSS" in the title, what does that mean?

This goes back to Skyrim. When I play Skyrim I play exclusively with Requiem, and anyone that knows Requiem knows it can be pretty polarizing for a balance overhaul. I would make tons of small tweaks to Requiem with TES5edit/xEdit, and each tweak would get its own ESP; that way I could easily toggle them off and on when new versions of Requiem released. And of course, every mini-mod would have the CROSS tag to keep things clean in my load order. Fast forward to Fallout 4 and I still used the tag for my own mods, which I eventually started releasing, and now here we are. The word 'CROSS' itself is just my real name, in all caps for visibility, it's not some absurd acronym.


You’ve been making mods for Fallout 4 since 2015, are there any mods in your collection that you’re particularly proud of?

CROSS_Crits. I still do a double take sometimes when testing newer stuff in-game and seeing the aftermath from the new critFX. Its scary in an unintended way.



CROSS_Crucible, one of your newest releases, is your first mod for Skyrim. Will you be working more with Skyrim or was this a one-off?

It depends on if I start up another Skyrim playthrough (before ES6 at least). I'm sure once I get back into it I'll get a shot of inspiration, and then we'll have another 'CROSS_' Skyrim mod. I do enjoy The Elder Scrolls more than I do Fallout, so it will probably happen eventually. My biggest deterrent to messing with Skyrim is the lack of customization Skyrim offers, I'm totally spoiled by the Fallout 4 crafting system and all the possibilities it provides.


What tools do you use when crafting your mods and why?

Photoshop for general concepts, Zbrush for the high poly, Substance Painter for textures, Nifskope for special FX, and then xEdit/CreationKit for the ESP. Photoshop/Zbrush/Substance are basically standards of video games art production, and they're all really good, well documented, programs.



What are your thoughts on Fallout 76 and are you interested in modding it?

The game itself looks neat, folks have been dreaming of a co-op Fallout/Elderscrolls experience since Morrowind, so its great that they're finally doing it. I didn't get much time with the BETA, but the core gameplay loop seems like it will hold people's attention for a very long time. I need a ladder/rating system to stay interested in PvP, so I don't know how much time I'll spend with that aspect of the game. Internally the game seems very similar to Fo4, so any content I make going forward will probably work on both platforms, which is pretty cool.



Do you have an upcoming content you’d like to tell us about?

We don't have an official name yet, but I'm working with TheKite on a weapon inspired by the New Vegas Helios One quest. The plan is to give it two modes: A more traditional point and shoot laser mode, and a target designation mode that lets you mark an area and call down some orbital firepower. I posted a preview of the orbital strike FX recently.


If you could give one piece of advice to a new modder who wants to make content like yours, what would it be?

You have to want to learn, more so than you want the end result. It's the journey, not the destination, that sort of thing. And if you really do enjoy this kind of thing don't hesitate to spend money on education/tutorials. It's a hobby after all, any hobby worth doing is worth over-doing.


Is there anything else you’d like to say to the Nexus Mods community?

Please forgive me, Todd.




A big thank you to Niero for answering our questions. If there's an author or mod project you'd like to know more about, send your suggestions to BigBizkit or Pickysaurus

32 comments

  1. Hybris51129
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    I'm really late but I wanted to offer my two cents.

    I really do love your NSFW works because they add an harder edge to the Fallout world I want to play in that I will never see out of Bethesda. I can understand wanting to clean up your name and make yourself more presentable for Bethesda but I can only hope that if they never come around with a offer for you that you would consider letting someone else "re-release" your work.

    Oblivion, Fallout 3, New Vegas, Skyrim, and Fallout 4 all taught me that some of the best work and most passion comes from the makers of NSFW mods and help add to the customization that like you I crave to the point that I have largely moved away from some games because I can't get mods for them.

    No matter what content you release in the future I look forward to it and if you just so happen to do something risque all the better.
  2. lister1911
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    I'm guessing that asking about why Niero removed some of his, and TheKite's, NSFW mods from the Nexus was off limits? And before somebody chimes in, yes, I've heard the Bethesda job theory, and that for some reason, even though Fallout is rated M, Todd Howard (or corporate, lol) is concerned that lewd outfits in a mod author's repertoire creates an image problem for Beth. It still makes no sense, in that to my knowledge, no one knows who Niero really is. He can make all the Beth mods he wants, under whatever pseudonym he wants, with no one the wiser. And, if Beth wants to trade off of his name because Niero is well known in the mod community, then that's equally foolish because they can't change the fact that he's well known, in part, because of NSFW mods! The whole thing is a curiosity that feels like much ado about nothing.

    warheadz:
    16 November 2018, 7:35AM

    And btw, there's still a lot of desperate zealots who still worshipping your "old" works and still refuse to believe that you remove it from nexus, even some of them accusing you for being a sissy which i saw in another site lol

    As for "desperate zealots", I've seen none of that, not even at LL, but I have read many folks expressing their disappointment that many of the high-quality mods created by Niero and TheKite are no longer available from the Nexus. Fortunately, I was already using most all of the ones I wanted when they were taken down, but I absolutely agree that it's a shame they are no longer available for new folks, or those with corrupted/lost files.

    It would also have been nice to get Niero's take on how his gumroad site has been performing for him. I've read comments on the Nexus from peeps bashing him for charging for high res textures when clearly that's not the case. Most of those people don't even bother to visit his gumroad site because they'd see that all of those 2K/4K textures are still free and donations are optional. Personally, I'm happy to pitch in a couple bucks for those awesome textures because it's still way cheaper, much higher quality, and far more original than anything on the Creation Club!

    Overall, I'm glad you guys interviewed Niero and thanks for it, but next time, maybe try more in-depth and significant questions if you are able, please.

    Cheers!
    1. neoquinn
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      You can still find those mods if you know where to look!
    2. Pickysaurus
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      @lister1911: What kind of questions do you suggest?
    3. lister1911
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      Hey @Pickysaurus, I think it really depends on the guest, their history, and any controversy surrounding them. For Niero it was a goldmine of possibility because of everything that's going on with his mod removal, future Beth employment, his relationship with TheKite and the inspiration he draws from her art, his opinions on adult mods, and his work on gumroad. All that and more felt like a huge opportunity lost.

      For other mod authors it's going to hinge on who they are, what type of content they've produced, and any potential controversy surrounding them. You'd be able to tailor specific questions, targeting their unique circumstances, and then make sure to have quality follow up questions so you can dig down a little bit for us readers. For some generic questions, in addition to the great ones you guys already asked, I'd like to get their take on Vortex, are they using the Donation Point System, if not, why not? If so, is it helping? As fans, how can we best support their efforts either through donations, points, endorsements, paypal, or Patreon? How do they see the current state of modding? What studios are most supportive; Bethesda, CDPR, BioWare, etc.? What's their take on the Creation Club, Bethesda's new Atoms, FO76 not being on Steam, micro transactions in general, and whether modding is threatened by any/all of them? Would they do this fulltime, as a profession, if given the opportunity? How much time do they spend modding? How much time playing? How long did mod "x" take to complete? Do they prefer the CK or FO4EDIT (if applicable)? Why? Do they have any secret tips or tricks to share with fellow modders? Who is their favorite mod author and is there a question they'd like to ask him/her?

      I'm sure the readers here have much better questions than mine, and in fact, I'd love to hear what mod authors would like to ask other modders. Thanks very much for taking the time to engage and get ideas from us regular Joe's! These interviews are awesome, please keep them coming!

      ps. Completely unrelated but thanks for uploading the Vortex theme mod. Now I can have my Fallout green like Todd intended
      Hopefully themes will be part of the next update because it's a nifty QoL feature. Now that I've got the hang of it, I'm really digging Vortex!
    4. Karna5
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      It's true what lister1911 said about the potential questions as they are the entire reason I read the interview. I was only interested to find out more about why Niero pulled such intriquate and masterfully done mods and wanted to distance himself from them. But I also respect Niero's privacy, and if he did not wish to discuss it, then that is okay, too. I wonder, though, whether it was a lack of desire to discuss it or whether it simply was not asked.
    5. Niero
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      Those mods were removed because I hoped to 'clean up' my name and get a CC contract. I signed up to the CC on day one and never heard back in any official capacity. If I had known that past mature themed mods would blacklist me from any sort of contact with official channels I never would have done them in the first place. I originally made those mods for two reasons: I liked working with a professional artist (TheKite), and as a literal-who going into Fo4 from Skyim I knew mature mods were a fast track to a wider audience.

      I would prefer that 'other sites' not link and/or host to those mods anymore, but I have no real power to demand threads be deleted and links removed.

      As far as Gumroad goes, I'm much less of a fan of it now that they make users jump though so many hoops to get stuff for free. It's a great system that offers tons of bandwidth and bypasses the tyranny of Paypal, but I feel bad making people go though the extra steps to get stuff free. I'm not sure what you mean by performance, I feel like I get more donations with Gumroad than I did the 'paypal beg' via the Nexus, but that could just be overall increase in popularity, or people just not wanting to setup and use paypal. A lot of the people that complain about the high-res textures are just people that aren't patient enough to read the mod page/sticky comment, there's really no getting through to those folks though text, so I don't put much weight in their complaints.

      Some hot-takes from your seconds post:
      Ive never used Vortex, manual downloads and MO2 have always worked for me and its a 'not broke, dont fix' situation.
      I enable the DP system, and it works, though I feel bad taking anything out of it knowing Robin has to manually process every transaction so I've only 'cashed out' once.
      Supporting authors by any means is always helpful, I'd rather users support me in the way they are most comfortable with, rather than the way I prefer.
      Modding is in a great spot, professional grade software is relatively cheap these days for single licenses, and one-off tutorials have gotten extremely high quality with sites like Gumroad that offer direct reimbursement for tutorial authors.
      I don't think any company can beat Bethesda in terms of mod community support, the CK is such an amazing tool to give to fans.
      I like the idea of the CC, it's great to let modders add official-ish content to the FO/ES IPs.
      I don't think modding is threatened by Fo76, or micro transactions in general.
      I would mod full time in a heartbeat, making cool stuff that people enjoy as a regular job? hell yeah, sign me up.
      I go in shifts, I will create for months at a time while looking for new things to play, and then I will spend months playing while thinking about what to make next.
      Its hard to put a timer on a mod, they all have their own hurdles that end up taking longer than I expect.
      I use xedit/Fo4edit, I only use the CK when I have to do stuff xedit cant do. I like prefer the spreadsheet format.
      Secret tip is in the interview already, you have to want to learn more than you want the final result, or else you will burn out.
      Favorite mod authors are Registrator2000 for his technical mods, and m150 for his wacky stuff.
    6. CompliantCriminalScum
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      -snip-

      I have no clue how to delete posts on this forum OMEGALUL

    7. lister1911
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      I'm pretty humbled that Niero has taken the time to answer my additional questions! I'm a huge fan so thanks very much for the all the extra detail.

      If I may Niero, the rumor mill has been pretty crazy surrounding your removal of those particular TheKite mods on the Nexus. Your answer makes perfect sense; who could begrudge you taking down a couple of your more lewd contributions if it meant a real opportunity to score a legit job with Bethesda? But were you ever contacted outside of official channels and told that those past mature themed mods would, in fact, blacklist you from any sort of contact with Beth officially? I think that's a huge bit of information lots of mod authors would like to know, particularly those with aspirations to work in the industry professionally. For me, as a fan of your work, I thought it was a great trade. Sure we lost some sexy mods, but one of our own here on the Nexus was making it to the big leagues, and that was pretty damn cool! Unfortunately, it sounds like you took those mods down as a hedge against perceived or possible Bethesda discrimination based on their content, not any real directive from Beth clarifying resume requirements or disqualifiers? That sucks because that means the rumors of your new job with a Zenimax studio are sadly not true; but can you confirm? I completely understand if you don't want to comment though. I have to say, the thought of your talent and creativity with the backing of the actual studio, really had me excited for Creation Club content for the first time.

      As for my gumroad "performance" question, you are correct--I was asking which donation method had been most successful for you. Whether between gumroad, paypal, Nexus donation points, patreon, etc. did it seem that fans were more drawn to one system over the rest. It's interesting to learn from your response that gumroad appears to provide more donations, because it feels like that's also where the most complaints come from. As a fan, I actually like that it "reminds" me to consider a donation right as I'm looking at those beautiful textures. It's also convenient because, assuming that I log into gumroad, it tracks my donations. I think I've "accidentally" given to a couple BodySlide updates from the Nexus because it always asks me, and I never can remember when/if I last donated!

      To my knowledge you don't have a Patreon account; have you considered this as a way to increase fan support, offer exclusive content, and more directly interact with your fan base? And of course increase your monthly loot?!

      Glad to hear that your collaborations with TheKite will continue, even if they will be a little more SFW in the future. Thanks again for all the great mods, and the memories, those unique creations have given us fans in our play-throughs. I don't run a single Fallout 4 game that doesn't have your work prominently embedded. Here's to many more Niero and TheKite creations in the years to come; cheers!
    8. Niero
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      I talked to a forum admin from bethnet shortly after the program started, but they made it clear they weren't the one approving applications. We talked again some more when they featured some of my mods on the Bethnet Frontpage, but again nothing that suggested they wanted anything to do with me in a contract. I still took the mods down because if Bethesda is adverse to them then who knows who else could be, better to get rid of them now than let them cause more damage further down the line. I wouldn't doubt many Western/American companies are like that these days, playing it safe to escape the ire of overly sensitive media outlets.

      I really think its just paypal that people don't like. Nobody wants to manage an extra 'internet bank' if their regular bank card works just the same for 99% of the internet, it just sucks that small personal donations land in that 1%.

      Ive considered Patreon. My biggest hesitation is community management. I want to spend my free time doing mod stuff, not managing pledge goals, timed releases, discord and all the stuff that comes with private content communities.
    9. lister1911
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      Thanks again for replying Niero!

      I feel like I might have missed something that happened in the industry. If no one at Beth ever indicated that NSFW mods would be an impediment to your hiring, what makes you think Bethesda is adverse to them? Those mods you made in collaboration with TheKite were around for quite a while after the CC launched; I think me, and possibly other fans, figured that something specific recently happened to cause their removal. I'm wondering if Beth published a statement somewhere about lewd mods, their creators, and how that could impact employment opportunities? Was it something like that?

      Understood regarding Patreon. I'm still going to stay on the lookout just in case!

      Anyway, that's all the questions from me! It's been very gracious of you to provide the time to tackle these rumors and fan based questions about your work and career. If Bethesda doesn't hire you, they're giant fools, but from a selfish fan's standpoint, I'm exceedingly happy that you're still working on mods for Fallout 4! Thank you very much.
    10. Darthfluenza
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      I'm not gonna suger coat it but I was pretty disappointed after you took down your more adult works, however I still have them thankfully more due to a fluke than anything intentional.

      I like using Gumroad to donate to you though, so please do keep using it. I feel it's a fair system as I don't make much money myself but I pay what I can trying to base my amounts off of what I would expect to pay for cosmetics or DLC for other games.
    11. fftfan
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      I really think its just paypal that people don't like. Nobody wants to manage an extra 'internet bank' if their regular bank card works just the same for 99% of the internet, it just sucks that small personal donations land in that 1%.

      I've considered Patreon. My biggest hesitation is community management. I want to spend my free time doing mod stuff, not managing pledge goals, timed releases, discord and all the stuff that comes with private content communities.

      Agreed. I feel the current approach you're taking is the best way and allows you to just do what you do best. It's not a business relationship like customer & business, we view you solely as a 3D artist and can feel free to support you as desired/reasonable for us. Money is tight for me right now but I do plan to donate at some point, right now I am buying software and then plan to spend on Gumroad tutorials & maybe Flipped Normals too since they've got some great ZBrush tutorials. First I need to decide on all the programs to specialize in as there's so many I saw from looking at the Gumroad tutorials. 3D modeling there's 3DS Max, Maya, Blender, MODO Foundry, Marvelous Designer, ZBrush, Cinema4D, Allegorithmic's got one too IIRC. Texturing there's Photoshop, Substance Painter/Designer, 3DCoat, Quixel, GIMP, Corel Painter plus probably tons more as I don't yet know much about them. It seems the only way to learn is to own a wide variety of them and follow tutorials for any of them to improve general skills. I think the best way I can give back is by becoming an artist too someday and making something you might also like, the best reward for you is probably if people also get inspired to create high quality outfits and your level of quality gets us to aim for similarly high quality. Imagine you create the great outfits & then 10 people decide as a result they want to create outfits too. I'll keep in mind desire to learn more than desire for an end result. It may be slow going but it's basically my hobby now.
       
      I view you as someone who's chasing the ultimate outfits & weapons basically forging the ultimate mods which to me is the opposite of the guys who are chasing my wallet. With businesses I have to always remain skeptical because it's only about the exchange of money & in reality creativity does not play any role. With Patreon there's the concern that it turns into a business of selling mods & at that point we have to worry about greed overtaking creativity. There's the concern it turns things into money-centric approach which when min-maxed becomes exploitative. This may result in decisions like:

      • Quantity over quality, like how AAA foregoes quality assurance in favor of putting more products on the shelf & with less dev time on each of them. Also because after the fact it's too late since money is paid in advance so it's cheaper to just say day 1 buyers = Beta Testers or if reputation isn't important, to outright ignore any issues reported.[/*]
      • Aggressive over-valuation of content: DLC & game content valuations gravitate towards aiming at whales. It's like the 80-20 Pareto Principle where 80% of the revenue is predicted to come from 20% of the potential customer base, but the whales are a minority within this group. Free 2 Play & similar models take this to an extreme, targeting the probably 1% of players who will be most inclined to overpay. This is also happening in AAA now, seen with DLC that can be $10 for 1 hour of gameplay. My belief is this model results in a five-fold overvaluation on average, with the particularly greedy cases being even more so. Fallout 76 has this too, I hear the Greaser Jacket that in Fallout 4 the Atom Cats wear is sold in Atom store for equivalent of $5.[/*]
      • Chasing trends/focus group design/lowest common denominator: Doing only what sells, not what's awesome/creative/epic[/*]
      • [*]Splitting up content into smaller parts[/*]

      AAA are not trying to simply just get by, they are trying to get very rich. Lead devs get revenue/profit sharing so one very strong quarterly could potentially have them end up set for life if they're on the next Fortnite or even Star Wars Battlefront 2 collecting share of the proceeds from the lootboxes. I read a Cliff Bleszinski interview and it made me realize that probable many are not there for simply a love of video games, they are hoping for the big payday. I suspect devs with this mindset are favored for having similar mindset as the publishers and those who love games may get pushed out.
       
      I'm a careful observer and I do see signs that some who use Patreon as a platform to sell mods do appear to be trying the very same approach. With the heavily commercialized "AAA-like" approach it may lead to short term gain but when that approach is taken to the logical extreme people are getting a bad deal so they don't stick around forever. My approach as a consumer is to slow way down & stop with impulse buys, I've simply learned that when I get asked for money for gaming related things that 90% the time I'm getting ripped off so I've slowed right down and put a lot more time/thought into every purchase. This has saved me from getting 76 day one, as even though I'm always excited for new Fallout games past history has taught me to hold off & wait. I suspect many others will do the same as they're continually and repeatedly left dissatisfied. Part of this approach for me was getting into modding rather than buying most every AAA. I buy only a few now and alternate them with mod projects or just trying out the coolest new stuff on Nexus. I get far more enjoyment from carefully buying 3-5 games in a year rather than buying 25 on impulse and hating 20+ of them.
       
      Therefore I think the current route will be better for you in the long run. The creative approach & just making whatever you want is going to be a lot more fun for you. The community management is basically just marketing & customer engagement. As one of the top 3D artists on the Nexus you'll be able to get regular support from fans just by doing what you love to do.
       

      I talked to a forum admin from bethnet shortly after the program started, but they made it clear they weren't the one approving applications. We talked again some more when they featured some of my mods on the Bethnet Frontpage, but again nothing that suggested they wanted anything to do with me in a contract. I still took the mods down because if Bethesda is adverse to them then who knows who else could be, better to get rid of them now than let them cause more damage further down the line. I wouldn't doubt many Western/American companies are like that these days, playing it safe to escape the ire of overly sensitive media outlets.

      There's one hidden irony I suspect may be there. I suspect in knowing about those outfits that Todd or whoever from Bethesda/Zenimax corporate may possibly have been likely to actually be someone who personally installed & used the outfits on their own game. How else would they know about it, other than being actively participating in Fallout 4 modding? They were popular outfits(The newer non adult stuff being way more popular though) to be sure but it wasn't like they'd pop up on Gamespot or on Facebook/Twitter feeds of people who are not into Fallout 4 modding or only very casually, not viral where Community Managers would be reporting to Todd/Bethesda that "everybody's talking about it". Point being that IMO only avid mod users who also are interested in adult content would be actively familiar with them. The new stuff you've made would be more likely to be talked about and I'd have thought they would be what Bethesda would have thought about. I see them in the Image share all the time so I'd suspect them to pop up elsewhere. I think I might've seen some on Twitter, Bethesda had a tweet "3 years later, post your favorite memory of the Commonwealth" though for me I always have the outfits & Cryolance/Ruger/Blades.
       
      The silver lining is that at least nobody is telling you what you can & cannot make. They're not forcing you to make something you don't want to do or vetoing your ideas you want to make. I am a bit disappointed in Bethesda however, if they refuse to deal with you over something like that. I would have thought rather than CC they could hire you fully as a 3D artist for Starfield, TES VI & Fallout 5, maybe as the main armor/weapon designer. I did wonder what your take on TES armor would look like, for instance if you did a set of replacers from Iron to Daedric or your take on Daedric Artifacts. Poor form IMO if this is something forever impossible because of past outfits. I get that they may be concerned about the media outlets but I think the facts are we don't know who people's real identities are. The outlets wouldn't know if you were hired fully as a Bethesda dev unless it got some kind of announcement "Niero hired as TES VI's Armor Designer" which never typically happens for devs being hired unless it's a well known Director or big name like Chris Avellone so pretty much only game industry celebs.
  3. AGreatWeight
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    Thanks to Neiro, I killed a feral ghoul with a critical, only for it's charred skeleton form to reanimate thanks to a glowing one's radiation attack, then proceed to slowly shuffle after me.
    1. Ectolord
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      Sounds more like an awesome feature :P
  4. CompliantCriminalScum
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    Those mods were removed because I hoped to 'clean up' my name and get a CC contract. I signed up to the CC on day one and never heard back in any official capacity. If I had known that past mature themed mods would blacklist me from any sort of contact with official channels I never would have done them in the first place. I originally made those mods for two reasons: I liked working with a professional artist (TheKite), and as a literal-who going into Fo4 from Skyim I knew mature mods were a fast track to a wider audience.

    I would prefer that 'other sites' not link and/or host to those mods anymore, but I have no real power to demand threads be deleted and links removed.

    As far as Gumroad goes, I'm much less of a fan of it now that they make users jump though so many hoops to get stuff for free. It's a great system that offers tons of bandwidth and bypasses the tyranny of Paypal, but I feel bad making people go though the extra steps to get stuff free. I'm not sure what you mean by performance, I feel like I get more donations with Gumroad than I did the 'paypal beg' via the Nexus, but that could just be overall increase in popularity, or people just not wanting to setup and use paypal. A lot of the people that complain about the high-res textures are just people that aren't patient enough to read the mod page/sticky comment, there's really no getting through to those folks though text, so I don't put much weight in their complaints.

    Some hot-takes from your seconds post:
    Ive never used Vortex, manual downloads and MO2 have always worked for me and its a 'not broke, dont fix' situation.
    I enable the DP system, and it works, though I feel bad taking anything out of it knowing Robin has to manually process every transaction so I've only 'cashed out' once.
    Supporting authors by any means is always helpful, I'd rather users support me in the way they are most comfortable with, rather than the way I prefer.
    Modding is in a great spot, professional grade software is relatively cheap these days for single licenses, and one-off tutorials have gotten extremely high quality with sites like Gumroad that offer direct reimbursement for tutorial authors.
    I don't think any company can beat Bethesda in terms of mod community support, the CK is such an amazing tool to give to fans.
    I like the idea of the CC, it's great to let modders add official-ish content to the FO/ES IPs.
    I don't think modding is threatened by Fo76, or micro transactions in general.
    I would mod full time in a heartbeat, making cool stuff that people enjoy as a regular job? hell yeah, sign me up.
    I go in shifts, I will create for months at a time while looking for new things to play, and then I will spend months playing while thinking about what to make next.
    Its hard to put a timer on a mod, they all have their own hurdles that end up taking longer than I expect.
    I use xedit/Fo4edit, I only use the CK when I have to do stuff xedit cant do. I like prefer the spreadsheet format.
    Secret tip is in the interview already, you have to want to learn more than you want the final result, or else you will burn out.
    Favorite mod authors are Registrator2000 for his technical mods, and m150 for his wacky stuff.
     



    You don't know how eye-opening and refreshing it is to see a mod author comment on stuff like this without a heavy dosage of drama & hyperbole. Keep on keepin' on, Niero! You set an example for so many authors to follow.
  5. thekoenman
    thekoenman
    • member
    • 1 posts
    • 0 kudos
    If my character isn't holding any of Niero's modded items, he's better of naked. Thanks Niero for making the most beautiful items in the game!
  6. nyu0140
    nyu0140
    • member
    • 4 posts
    • 0 kudos
    whats the the name of that airstrike tipe mod gif up thar can sumone give me a link
    1. Pickysaurus
      Pickysaurus
      • Community Manager
      • 5,538 posts
      • 139 kudos
      That's one of Nieros upcoming projects :)
  7. GoddOward
    GoddOward
    • member
    • 1,483 posts
    • 11 kudos
    I remember you Neiro...I used to have fun playing with your mods...when I used to play FO4. Nowadays...I only play SSE. But, like all things, I will eventually swing back to FO4.
  8. elr0y7
    elr0y7
    • premium
    • 833 posts
    • 27 kudos
    Thank you Niero, one of my favorite modders, definitely my favorite for Fallout 4. Your mods really inspire me to follow suit, and I'm amazed to learn that you just got into digital design with Fallout 4. I'm sure you're a busy guy, but if you ever posted tutorials with your creative process then I'd be all over them.
  9. oliverrogerr
    oliverrogerr
    • member
    • 391 posts
    • 1 kudos
    love all your mods
  10. danexuslurker
    danexuslurker
    • supporter
    • 855 posts
    • 42 kudos
    I love reading these mod author interviews. It's interesting to see the different reasons that people get into modding and where they get their inspiration from. I also enjoy getting some insight into the individual modding process and what tools different authors use.

    (By the way, you forgot to change the mod author's name in the "thank you" note at the bottom. It still says "FrankFamily" from a past interview!)
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