Donation Points system now live for mod authors on Nexus Mods

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Back in December I announced our intention to create and release a system that provided some modest rewards to mod authors on Nexus Mods.

It's taken us a bit longer to implement than we initially anticipated, but I am happy to announce that from today, any mod authors on Nexus Mods will be able to opt their files into our Donation Points system.

The premise of the Donation Points (DP) system is relatively simple on the surface. Each month Nexus Mods will donate a set amount of money into a central donation pool from which the total DP available that month will be calculated. At the end of each month, mod authors will receive DP based on how many unique downloads their mods received that month. How many DP your mod(s) receive will depend on a number of factors including how much money we have donated into the pool and how many unique downloads all the other opted-in files from other authors have received.

1,000 Donation Points will be worth $1 and mod authors will be able to choose from a number of ways to spend their DP, including receiving straight up Pay Pal donations, buying Premium Membership from Nexus Mods, donating their DP to a number of charities or sharing their DP with other users on the site that they like or have received help from. We hope to expand on what's available in our store over the coming months and years while promoting exactly how much has been donated to mod authors (in a general sense) and how much we've given to charities on their behalf.

You've probably got some questions about this system so we've setup a Frequently Asked Questions section that should hopefully answer all your questions in detail.

There is a 3 month delay before any payouts happen so we've still got plenty of time before the first Donation Points are handed out to mod authors who opt into the system. We've done the bulk of the work on this system, but it's still early days and we've got a little ways to go before it's fully complete. However, we'd really like to get the ball rolling and letting mod authors opt their files into this new system is the first milestone.

In the first couple of months the money we donate into the pool will be lower than what we hope to donate each month. This is because we know it will take time for word to get out and we'd like to give all mod authors a good opportunity to gain from this system, rather than chucking a load of money into a big explosive opening only for a limited number of authors to benefit from it. However, I've set aside a budget of $100,000 from Nexus Mod's own funds over the next 12 months to this system. Our gesture of thanks from Nexus Mods, and the users of Nexus Mods, to all the mod authors who use our site and share their work freely with the internet. Looking forward, we would also like to introduce a crowd funding mechanism that will allow users of the site to donate to the monthly pool and top up what Nexus Mods is already paying in each month.

Also of note, we've updated our permissions system on mod pages to include an area where you can specify whether you'd like others using your assets/mods to be able to receive Donation Points for their mods and whether you'd like to be contacted for permission first. If this is of interest to you, please update your "Permissions" on your files accordingly.

Because our Donation Points system makes extensive use of the "Unique Downloads" stats, we have had to make a tough choice and remove our "guest downloading" system entirely from the site. For those not aware, up until this point we allowed non-members and users who are not logged in to download files that were less than 2MB in size. Unfortunately, with the prevalence of proxies, VPNs and services like TOR it has become impossible to accurately track unique downloads from these users and it opens up an avenue for abuse in our Donation Point system. As such, we had to choose between those downloads not counting in our Donation Point system or removing the guest download system entirely. We felt not counting these downloads would significantly impact some of the smaller mods out there (of which very popular mods, like SkyUI, are a part) and thus, we've decided to make it so that you need to be logged in to Nexus Mods in order to download all files on the site now. We apologise for any inconvenience this may cause.

For more information on this system please read through our FAQ section. If you're a mod author and would like to opt-in one or more of your files, head on over to our opt-in page. You can access this page at any time from the "Mods" drop-down in the top-nav or in the bottom-nav of the site. And if you'd like to see what you can buy with your future DP then you can check out our store page.

233 comments

  1. NMC
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    NMC You really should be opted in. Even if it is to donate the points to charity. 


    Thanks Tekmage, I've altered a few settings on my pages today but to be honest I'm not 100% sure exactly what I've opted into yet - be it direct donations, donation points or memberships donations, or all three! I'll read the system properly later to get a fuller understanding of it all and tweak my settings accordingly then when I have more time. There may even be an option to pass a points on to other users- there's a few people who have helped out on my mod pages so it would be good to say thanks.
  2. tekmage
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    NMC You really should be opted in. Even if it is to donate the points to charity. 
  3. NMC
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    In response to post #72504348.


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    That said, I am not a fan of the pooled points donation approach at all. I saw no issue with the direct donation via paypal situation, as it felt personal to you, a direct thank-you for your efforts from someone who downloaded your mod and liked it. Why there is now a middle man between you and direct donations and a storefront to negotiate and to spend your tokens in, says more about what modding really means to those who really control it. Is it a hobby to them?

    Could you clarify what you mean here, please?

    There are still direct donations to authors, the two systems are completely separate. It's not a choice between one or the other - mod authors can choose to have no donations, direct donations but no DP, or direct donations AND DP (on top of whatever other donation platforms they use, such as Patreon, provided it remains without our ToS). The result is that the DP system provides a significant injection of donation money into mod author's pockets than was originally possible simply with direct donations - but direct donations still exist and are still used by users.

    As such, there is not a "middle man between you and direct donations". There is a middle man between you and DP, because Nexus Mods is the majority contributor towards the DP pool, but DP and direct donations are two completely separate entities on the site that do not touch each other in any way.
     


    Ah, thanks for the clarification of the system, it seems I had completely misunderstood it. I was under the wrong impression that the direct donation system had been removed altogether in place of a pooled donation scheme. Somehow I got that stuck in my head during the early inception of the idea, and I heard a fair bit of speculation at that time from various sources and I decided to remove all donations from my mods back then. I did not see it's final implementation as it stands. I apologise for the wrong statement I made there.
     
    It currently seems a lot better than I realised in that case, allowing tailoring to mod authors preferences. As I now understand it, it seems like an improvement even over the original donation system. I will read over the system in place fully again to see the options available.
     
    For the record, I do recognise that is was Nexus who first created a donations scheme at all for modders to benefit from, so I appreciate the very fact it exists at all as I'm sure all modders here do too.
  4. NMC
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    In response to post #60434912. #60435157, #60439167, #60487932, #60495767, #60568452, #60581147, #63075281, #64229301 are all replies on the same post.


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    I know this is an old thread but someone has to define the difference between a hobby and releasing mods for other people to use.

    If you're fixing up a car as a hobby, you're using your time and money to get new parts and installing them into the car, and making modifications to it. Once you're done, it benefits nobody except you. You have a sweet new ride and you're not going to let just anyone drive it.

    Making mods is a hobby too, sure. You're spending your time making modifications to a game, or adding new content to it. But the moment you release it for others to use, it becomes work, and i'll explain why:

    When making mods for yourself, you don't have to care about how it's presented and if there's any potential bugs. I've made a scroll enchanting mod for Skyrim that I install every time I play the game, but I never released it because it has a few minor bugs that I personally know how to work around while I play (but could take me weeks of work to research and find fixes for), and the mod requires you to understand the concept of scroll enchanting which for me would require adding these instructions in some form (lore books, loading screen tips, etc). So in the case of this mod, it has 100% been a hobby, and as a result you don't get to play it.

    But the moment you decide to release a mod, it adds work to your hobby. You have to fix every bug, worry about compatibility with other mods, make sure people understand it, write descriptions, instructions, changelogs, and take screenshots and make videos to present it well on the mod website.
    On top of that, you're signing up to act as life-time customer support by responding to questions and getting requests for changes or fixes, and performing updates to the mod in case the game has an update which breaks your mod. (or people will complain and call you a bad mod creator).

    Just today I had a comment on a Garry's Mod map I made 7 years ago, claiming there was a bug. As a result, I had to install the game, launch it, and perform tests until I could determine there was no bug and that it was caused by another addon that the user had installed, and then write a response to the comment explaining why it wasn't a bug and what they could do to troubleshoot.
    If I had not done all this, other people would see the comment made by the user, and assume there was a bug and that the author no longer cared.

    As a final note, going back to the car hobby example:
    The moment you start dedicating your time to fixing someone else's car, it becomes work.
     


    @ Mornedil,
     
    I agree. Just recently I had a comment regarding a 'bug' in one of my mods that is about 8 years old, and the poster remarked that ...'it was unlikely to be 'fixed' as development has ended'. I felt the arm-twist in that false remark so to avoid anyone believing their claim, I now felt obliged to address it. Turned out there was no error at all, but it required me to re-download 3 versions of my mod, install each version and test and view the files in Photoshop to prove this, then reply back with my findings. Took me about an hour or so to do this. No response back....
     
    But I had to do all this, as the accusation was that I had released a broken file and that comment would maybe put people off downloading the mod. Or my 'work' is shoddy. So it is "work" maintaining a mod, and replying to questions often for years on end is work too. A lot of time is spent that you don't want to spend, but feel obliged as you have a little pride in your work, and to fullfil community expectations of you. A lot of mods are better maintained than the games themselves, bugs fixed, questions answered- unlike a lot of the broken releases we all actually paid for. Try and get a developer to fix a bug or reply and you'll know what I mean. So, to ask for a little appreciation for your efforts is not a lot to ask. For those saying they won't donate, hey that's fine, we don't ask for a payment for each download. But it would be great if we could. And it makes it a nice gesture when someone actually takes the time and trouble to send a donation to you. You feel like it was genuinely appreciated- and guess what? It actually encourages you to maybe release another mod when you feel appreciated. If it wasn't for modders, Nexus woudn't exist and nor would your bespoke games. You would be left with the default release, replete with bugs, faults and standard features. Maybe we deserve a little credit, appreciation and *gasp* 'reward'? At least to cover costs like software, electricity etc. Let's be clear- there is a world of difference between being paid to do something, and a donation. We don't demand to be 'paid', but we do appreciate receiving a 'donation'. It's voluntary. Using analogies like 'building sandcastles' insinuates that it's all just a childish pursuit and not to be appreciated. Fair enough, some people are just like that I suppose. But in real life you don't often get strangers walking over and complaining about your sandcastle, asking you to fix it, change it, build it bigger and better, or kicking it apart because they don't like it. Unless it really does have a personal value to them of course...
     
    That said, I am not a fan of the pooled points donation approach at all. I saw no issue with the direct donation via paypal situation, as it felt personal to you, a direct thank-you for your efforts from someone who downloaded your mod and liked it. Why there is now a middle man between you and direct donations and a storefront to negotiate and to spend your tokens in, says more about what modding really means to those who really control it. Is it a hobby to them?
    1. Dark0ne
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      That said, I am not a fan of the pooled points donation approach at all. I saw no issue with the direct donation via paypal situation, as it felt personal to you, a direct thank-you for your efforts from someone who downloaded your mod and liked it. Why there is now a middle man between you and direct donations and a storefront to negotiate and to spend your tokens in, says more about what modding really means to those who really control it. Is it a hobby to them?


      Could you clarify what you mean here, please?

      There are still direct donations to authors, the two systems are completely separate. It's not a choice between one or the other - mod authors can choose to have no donations, direct donations but no DP, or direct donations AND DP (on top of whatever other donation platforms they use, such as Patreon, provided it remains without our ToS). The result is that the DP system provides a significant injection of donation money into mod author's pockets than was originally possible simply with direct donations - but direct donations still exist and are still used by users.

      As such, there is not a "middle man between you and direct donations". There is a middle man between you and DP, because Nexus Mods is the majority contributor towards the DP pool, but DP and direct donations are two completely separate entities on the site that do not touch each other in any way.
  5. JinKanzaki
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    I wonder how many of the people complaining here have spent more than 10 bucks on mod donations in the past 10 years...
    1. User_23213994
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      I don't donate and never will. Modding is a hobby and doesn't require money for compensation. Feedback is perfectly fine.
    2. FLipdeezy
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      Lol no offense but who made you the authority?
    3. User_23213994
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      Okay, I'm going outside to the beach and making a sand castle every day. Why? because I like doing it. it's a hobby. If you don't throw cash at me, you are an inconsiderate individual because you can't understand how much effort, hard work and hours I've put into it just so people can look at it.

      Pay me. Now.
    4. MPDStudios
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      Ikr
    5. FLipdeezy
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      That was incoherent and emotional
    6. User_23213994
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      Emotional? I fail to see how it was emotional. Incoherent? No, you fail to see the picture.
    7. piotrmil
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      >Modding is a hobby and doesn't require money for compensation.

      As a very humble mod author, I completely agree.
    8. Corrodias
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      Neither do individuals like any of you get to decide what, for other people, may be "required", but also having the option to give someone money doesn't somehow make it a requirement.
    9. Mornedil
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      I know this is an old thread but someone has to define the difference between a hobby and releasing mods for other people to use.

      If you're fixing up a car as a hobby, you're using your time and money to get new parts and installing them into the car, and making modifications to it. Once you're done, it benefits nobody except you. You have a sweet new ride and you're not going to let just anyone drive it.

      Making mods is a hobby too, sure. You're spending your time making modifications to a game, or adding new content to it. But the moment you release it for others to use, it becomes work, and i'll explain why:

      When making mods for yourself, you don't have to care about how it's presented and if there's any potential bugs. I've made a scroll enchanting mod for Skyrim that I install every time I play the game, but I never released it because it has a few minor bugs that I personally know how to work around while I play (but could take me weeks of work to research and find fixes for), and the mod requires you to understand the concept of scroll enchanting which for me would require adding these instructions in some form (lore books, loading screen tips, etc). So in the case of this mod, it has 100% been a hobby, and as a result you don't get to play it.

      But the moment you decide to release a mod, it adds work to your hobby. You have to fix every bug, worry about compatibility with other mods, make sure people understand it, write descriptions, instructions, changelogs, and take screenshots and make videos to present it well on the mod website.
      On top of that, you're signing up to act as life-time customer support by responding to questions and getting requests for changes or fixes, and performing updates to the mod in case the game has an update which breaks your mod. (or people will complain and call you a bad mod creator).

      Just today I had a comment on a Garry's Mod map I made 7 years ago, claiming there was a bug. As a result, I had to install the game, launch it, and perform tests until I could determine there was no bug and that it was caused by another addon that the user had installed, and then write a response to the comment explaining why it wasn't a bug and what they could do to troubleshoot.
      If I had not done all this, other people would see the comment made by the user, and assume there was a bug and that the author no longer cared.

      As a final note, going back to the car hobby example:
      The moment you start dedicating your time to fixing someone else's car, it becomes work.
  6. steve40
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    The ship has already sailed. Months ago.
  7. Sedality
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    In response to post #60450772.


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    "User files: 0"

    I shouldn't worry too much about that. Nexus will first and foremost be a free platform; free to download a metric ton of awesome user made content and free to share your own mods with others, that is. The donations come from the platform itself rather than directly from users (which few ever opt to do anyway), that's a notable difference compared to say, Creation Club. If anything, it's an added incentive for people to create and share mods and that's never a bad thing. As most of us modders are used to the fact that we don't earn anything with it and do it for fun and contribution anyhow.

     


     
     

     

    Honestly, I could care less about your sand castle that you spent SO much hard work on.. I don't use it, nor do I want it.

     

    However, I sincerely believe in paying someone for their time, especially if I use their product.

     

    Your sand castle.. Moot point and a terrible analogy.

     

    I realize this is a really old post but it was one of the first that I saw in looking into premium membership, and as of yesterday, I've become a supporter! 


  8. ZMD78
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    Mod creators are just like any other creative artist or producer, all of those people complaining that mod creators should not be paid for a hobby is the most ridiculous thing ever. How many people actually do get paid for what starts out as a hobby ! Plenty of people ; in the creative world especially!! The option of donating to modders is there for those that really do appreciate their hard work. quite a number of years ago i created a map and mods for a non bethesda game i spent 6 months on it, i can tell you it was more than a hobby for me ,just becuase i didnt get paid for it doesnt mean it isnt work! in fact for the most part modding can be pretty damn hard work! ;) just wanted to say my bit on this topic.
    1. Tentain
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      Yeah, I don't really understand where they're coming from either honestly.personally I've sunk over 830 hours into the creation kit and it's not like playing a game and having fun; these are the same types of tools the developers work with.Far as I see it; it's basically like saying that the development team for the game shouldn't get paid because they're working on a game. Making music, art, and every other creative based outlet one can simple say "It's just a hobby, they shouldn't be allowed to accept money for it."and it just sounds stupid.
  9. Infamous95
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    So I have opted in on a few mods I have uploaded. But for whatever reason I can't add the Wildlife Conservation at all I see an option in the bottom left corner but theres no way to click save on it. Any ideas?

    Edit: thought I should add this. When I click save it wont do anything. When I exit it reverts back 100% to me.
  10. newman55
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    It's on a NET10-style system, so you only receive the DP that you earned from 3 months ago. So if you earned 5,000 DP in June, you'll get that DP in your Nexus DP wallet in September.

    Edit: But more importantly, it doesn't look like you've signed up any of your mods for the donation points system.


    Thanks for the answer, I did not know that I needed to register my mods.
    1. DrakeTheDragon
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      The last paragraph in the opening post, or rather the links therein, explain in detail what exactly you need to do.
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