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zhpete

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zhpete

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9 comments

  1. zhpete
    zhpete
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    No, it's not intentional; this mod isn't intended for regular gameplay use.
  2. atheoang3l0
    atheoang3l0
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    Some areas like the Lair are really dark. Is this intentional?
  3. PlennyTheGoat
    PlennyTheGoat
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    Amazing - that looks like a considerable amount of work - you've done it fantastically well. And such a cool idea too. I'm in love with both games, so getting to experience them mixed like this is the best. Thank you.
  4. GrosRelou
    GrosRelou
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    WOW !!
    next step, real world visual ;D

    one question, where is for change HDR / exposure values ?
    1. zhpete
      zhpete
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      I didn't change any HDR or exposure values, but those are also in the TOD Visual Environment files that I modified for this mod. I think HDR stuff is in the color correction component and exposure is in the tonemap component.
    2. GrosRelou
      GrosRelou
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      it's just for me I want to adjust the HDR in relation to the intensity of my screen
    3. GrosRelou
      GrosRelou
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      I find, ve_tod-posteffects > TonemapComponentData > white level, 8,4 > 12
    4. zhpete
      zhpete
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      The tonemap stuff probably needs to be done for each ve_tod_XXXX file, not just the posteffects one.

      Also, check the PropertyOverrides section of the Tonemap component. The properties listed there are the only things actually being changed, so if the property you are changing is not listed in there then nothing will happen when you change it. If it is not there you must add it, and you must also update the PropertyOverrideMasks.

      To calculate the PropertyOverrideMasks, read through all of the properties from top to bottom and if the property is being overridden write down a 1, if it isn't then write down a 0. You must write these 1s and 0s from right to left as you go down. This will then give you a binary number that you can convert to decimal using an online converter, and the number you get is the Override Mask. (I know that's really complicated). If you have a really long list of properties, you must start a new number after every 32 properties.

      An easier way to do this may be to take the existing PropertyOverrideMask value and convert it from decimal to binary, then simply identify which bit matches up with the property you are changing, change it from 0 to 1 and then convert the new binary number back to decimal.

      Also, sometimes this is not even enough because some other file may also modify the same property and have priority over the one you change.

      Hope this helps, and good luck!
  5. aReallyShortName
    aReallyShortName
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    woah, thats so cool!
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